Advertisement

firehouse pizza banner
jones banner
aberdeen bap 2021

Patty Craig: A Slice of Time

Having listened to some of the vaccination talk, I tried to remember all of the immunizations my children had received – and failed. I looked on the CDC website (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/vaccines-diseases.html) to refresh my memory and found an informative list. Many more immunizations than I expected were listed.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend the seventeen vaccines listed below for dangerous or deadly diseases. The website provided information regarding each immunization.

Chickenpox (Varicella)

Diphtheria

Flu (Influenza)

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis B

Hib (Haemophilus influenza type b)

HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

Measles

Meningococcal

Mumps

Pneumococcal

Polio (Poliomyelitis)

Rotavirus

Rubella (German measles)

Shingles (Herpes Zoster)

Tetanus (Lockjaw)

Whooping Cough (Pertussis)

Nine other non-routine vaccines (not a part of the recommended immunization schedules) are also available to those in research, in certain work settings, or who may need to travel to certain areas of the world. Again, additional information was provided regarding each of these immunizations.

Adenovirus

Anthrax

Cholera

Japanese Encephalitis (JE)

Rabies

Smallpox

Tuberculosis

Typhoid Fever

Yellow Fever

According to the CDC, factors which may play some part in whether a specific immunization is recommended include: age, location, job, lifestyle, travel schedule, health conditions or previous vaccinations.

I was interested to read about the recommended and the non-routine vaccinations. Sometimes a vaccination may be necessary before contact and sometimes after contact to a disease. And unfortunately, I likely need a booster or two from the list of recommended immunizations.

Tags: 


Bookmark and Share

Advertisements