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Dr. Ghayth Hammad: Good People Make Bad Choices Too

So many things can be attached to the word "addict". When most of us think of an addict we may picture a person who is filthy, associated with a low economic status, not wanting to work, and without morals. Maybe it is pictures of past experiences you have had with family members or friends that pop into your brain when you think of addiction. We usually do not think of the church attending, functioning worker at our local grocery store or nearby shop, the family man or carpool mom that lives with drug or alcohol addiction, because it doesn't fit the "stigma". 

The statistics of addiction might be surprising:

- Almost 21 million Americans have at least one addiction, yet only 10% of them receive treatment.

- Drug overdose deaths have more than tripled since 1990.

- From 1999 to 2017, more than 700,000 Americans died from overdosing on a drug.

- In 2017, 34.2 million Americans committed DUI, 21.4 million under the influence of alcohol and 12.8 million under the influence of drugs.

- About 20% of Americans who have depression, or an anxiety disorder also have a substance use disorder.

- More than 90% of people who have an addiction started to drink alcohol or use drugs before they were 18 years old.

Many times, a person may think they have addiction controlled. They can continue to work and keep their same pace of life for quite a while. The secrets are kept hidden from co-workers and often even family, but this does not last. Things can begin to spiral. Money may become a serious issue due to secretly purchasing high dollar pills from the street. Family relationships begin to change. Mistakes at work that were maybe once blown off by others start to pile up. Guilt will become overwhelming. Depression can become too much. The thoughts of asking for help can be suffocating because this secret would be exposed. Hope seems lost. 

If this is you, and you want to reach out for help, please call us. We are here and want you to know that there is HOPE and it is REAL. Recovery is possible! It can happen! Let us know how we can help.  There are resources in our community to assist you. Call us at 270-526-9652 or visit our website at http://www.ghaythhammadmd.com if we can assist you in reaching recovery. 

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